Art as therapy is wonderful and effective. I wonder if any of these museums will consider hiring a credentialed art therapist to direct these programs. Credentialed art therapists have been professionally trained in the therapeutic use of art and can facilitate and oversee effective programming.

www.nytimes.com/2020/06/15/arts/design/art-therapy-museums-virus.html

Music and art as an “accumulation of wisdom, the context art gives us that puts life into perspective, (Sonny Rollins) and transcends politics. From an article in the New York Times, May 18, 2020, as told to Ian Carlino.

Patterns That Connect

January 27, 2020

youtu.be/ChWOq3rRxOE

This is a fascinating video showing the movement of a school of striped eel catfish moving collectively almost as a single entity, reminiscent of flocks of sparrows behaving similarly but in the air, not under water. It also brings to mind Gregory Bateson’s great 1972 book, Mind and Nature: A Necessary Unity;, in which he discusses observable and recognizable patterns in nature from an epistemological perspective. Knowing can and does take place of systems and meta-systems through observation of “patterns that connect”.

This video below shows a graphic comic artist demonstrating automatic drawing. I learned to do this in the late sixties when I was studying art. Although the artist says, “let your brain” do the work, I actually experience it as letting my body/mind do the drawing while suspending any conscious, deliberate attention. (I imagined that the energy for the movement of the drawing come directly from my heart through my arm, bypassing my head. I felt like an observer to my own drawing process.) While following along as an observer I was always surprised at what emerged. At some point late in the process I would notice an object emerging from the markings. At this point I would redirect my attention and apply deliberate action to bringing out the newly discovered object. This process of automatic drawing has been very rewarding, both as a meditative process and a way to discover new images heretofore hidden below my conscious awareness.

www.youtube.com/watch

 

Here is a very good article on creative flow from an angle from which you may not be aware. Enjoy.

 

How to Unleash the Great Perfection of Creativity

By Geshe Tenzin Wangyal Rinpoche

From Lion’s Roar; Buddhist Wisdom for Our Time, July 2, 2017

Informed by the profound teachings of Dzogchen, the Great Perfection, Geshe Tenzin Wangyal tells us how to unleash powerful creative energy we can use anywhere, from the office to the art studio.

Photo by Jennifer Pack.

READ THE ENTIRE ESSAY HERE.

 

 

 

Glaser draws and talks

In the short video below by C. McCoy via Vimeo, Milton Glaser talks about the importance of drawing- while drawing, of course! 

 
http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=6986303&server=vimeo.com&show_title=1&show_byline=1&show_portrait=0&color=&fullscreen=1

MILTON GLASER DRAWS & LECTURES from C. Coy on Vimeo.

Fellini’s Imagination

October 24, 2009

Fellini sketch 

"For me the world of my imagination is always closer to the truth than is the truth." 

"If I wander around the world looking at things, it is only to reassure myself that the world I have invented is true."

Frederico Fellini (1920-1993)


Every issue of Life Magazine until the end of 1972 is available on Google Books for free. I did a search there for imagination and found this entry: From the July 30, 1971 issue of Life is an article by Dora Jane Hamblin on Frederico Fellini , the great Italian movie director. This piece is about the creation of his made-for-tv film, The Clowns. If you are familiar with his films you know how imaginative they are- perhaps some of the best examples of imagination in filmmaking. The Life magazine article has sketches made by Fellini as studies for this film.

Apparently, Fellini was greatly influenced the Jungian analyst Dr. Ernst Bernhard and by the autobiography of Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams, Reflections. It seems that some of Jung's ideas influenced some of his important films– 81/2 (1963), Juliet of the Spirits (1965), Satyricon (1969), Casanova (1976), and City of Women (1980).