Meditation Retreat

April 23, 2014

TWR70b

A few weeks ago I attended a three day meditation retreat at the Ligmincha Institute in Virginia. The retreat was awesome and I am sharing here a link to a video which was taken during this very retreat. It is an hour long so it does go into some depth and includes some guided meditation by Tenzin Wangyal Rinpoche and an interesting question and answer session with questions from around the world via internet. Enjoy.

Click on a link above or find the video here: http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/46068128

 

In a 2013 interview, Geshe Tenzin Wangyal Rinpoche explains his approach to teaching in the West and clarifies essential principles of Buddhism and Bon.

Effective Change

July 12, 2011

—  If you want to change others, change yourself.  —

The Flying DrumThe Flying Drum by Bradford P. Keeney
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Keeney is a therapist who used systems theory and cybernetics and had a national reputation with several publications in the 80’s. He was a student of Gregory Bateson and Heinz von Foerster. He has developed a radical approach to therapy which is deeply informed and shaped by shamanism.

If you are interested in this, there is an engaging podcast available that I would recommend with an interview with Keeney by Tami Simon of Sounds True. Here is a link to this podcast.

“The Flying Drum” book is a fast read. He tells his personal story of his own “professional” development and describes his way he met with shamans from all around the world, received initiations and instructions, and brings what he learned to the world. It is literally fantastic, operating in that domain of what seems unbelievable and yet here in direct experience.

While the book has similarities to New Age books like those of Lynn Andrews, etc., it feels to have more substance and is more grounded in ordinary reality while not shy of stories of the seeming impossible. It is also a bit like Carlos Casteneda’s books with many descriptions of encounters and personal experiences but without going into as much of the detail of the stories of his contact with the shamans.

I found this book to be validating and inspiring.

This is a video of the a commencement speech delivered by Steve Jobs in 2005 at Stanford University. The 15 minute speech covers his early life, his successes and disappointments, how some of those disappointments led to later successes, his view of death as a motivator and contextualizer, and a comment on the Whole Earth Catalog (mentioned in an earlier post on this blog, here) as an influence for him.

This video may be all over the web by the time you read this post but this is worth watching. It's a good speech- moving at times- with good advice for the then new grads and for all of us. Let me know what you think by leaving a comment below.