Feb 1, 2011

February 1, 2011

Using imagery in therapy is energy medicine. If energy medicine can be defined as the means to change subtle energy systems in the body, then the use of imagery qualifies by addressing negative emotions in a way that can lead to transformation. Guided imagery, active imagination, and art therapy all can be used in this way.

Interesting new web site

September 11, 2010


Guided Imagery Collective Logo

Take a look at this new web site I discovered a couple of days ago, Guided Imagery Collective. Jose Said Osio is a kindred spirit and his well constructed and attractive site is about his interest in guided imagery, art, wellness, and spirit. Check it out.

Writer_surreal ~Philippe Fernandez, 2009, Examiner.com


Guided imagery can have many uses in our lives- here's an example of one more. In the June 28th publication of Examiner.com/Philadelphia, June Quesinberry continues her series, Personal Definition as a Writer with this third part that address a use of guided imagery for the writing process. She discusses the roles of the conscious and unconscious minds and how they can be used together to facilitate writing. 

"This is where guided imagery techniques, meditation, and self-hypnosis will puncture the holes in the walls of the mind between the active and inactive mindsets."

Have any of you tried this or anything like it?


Crow on stump1
I wonder if the readers of this blog have interesting or unusual ways to stimulate their imagination? Regular readers might surmise that I use direct interaction with imagery to stimulate imagination. Some imagery guides, such as the crow depicted here, become guides to access what is to be found in the imagination. I know this seems a bit redundant since using imagery is obviously itself a form of imagination. But I find this method to open the gates wide to the imagination. I have written about how this is done in this blog here.

Another method I have found to be useful is automatic drawing, or the scribble technique. Using this method I will begin a scribble with no conscious intention, stop scribbling when it feels time- usually before the scribble becomes too dense, and then search for nascent images in the scribble followed by a deliberate enhancement of those images. I have found this to be a surprising and rewarding method of discovery using the imagination.

How do you access your imagination? Share your techniques with us.

I’m a little late getting this on the blog, but I think it is worth posting anyway. There is still a little time left for you to register for Dr. Marty Rossman’s four week workshop in Guided Imagery for Self Healing. Readers of this blog will remember that I have mention Dr. Rossman several times and have reviewed some of his products. Highly recommended.

                                     ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

                        Your invitation to a 4 week workshop with
                                     Marty Rossman, MD

GUIDED IMAGERY FOR SELF-HEALING

An inspiring, refreshing, and enjoyable opportunity to learn to use guided imagery directly from one of the world’s leading experts on mind/body medicine and healing…

You’ll learn to use guided imagery…

… to deeply relax your mind and body
… to create unique images that help promote healing responses
… to connect to healing resources within yourself
… to create a healing practice

When:        Fridays, Feb 8  – 29            10:30 AM – 12 PM

Where:        Healus Center, 150 Nellen Ave, Larkspur, CA

How:        Call Marie or Christine at 925-8600 to register

How much?    Your registration fee of $245 includes an autographed copy of Dr. Rossman’s award-winning book and 4 CD set entitled “Guided Imagery for Self-Healing” (a $75 value) to guide you in your self-healing imagery practice at home. Your friends and family are also welcome at the same rate.

Till when?    This registration fee is only good until January 30th. After that,  $295.  Space is limited.

What else?    Patients of Dr. Rossman will be given Superbill receipts suitable for submission for insurance reimbursement.

“Marty Rossman is the world’s leading authority on guided imagery for health”                        Andrew Weil, M.D.

Fogerty_revival_image_2
John Fogerty is one of the founders and unmistakable lead voice of Creedence Clearwater Revival, one of the great bands of the sixties. I must admit a fondness for that band and much of the music Fogerty has produced since- sometimes called “swamp rock”- bluesy rock and roll with a southern, Louisiana feel. I haven’t heard enough of his new album, Revival, to review it responsibly but what I have heard so far is consistent with his previous work I have liked, perhaps this time with a little bit of a pop feel on a few of the cuts.

In a recent issue of Newsweek (December 3, 2007) Fogerty wrote an article in which he talks about his new album and the years of pain he endured as a result of the rancorous breakup of the old band, complete with difficult and lengthy lawsuits. I am writing about it here because I was moved by his candid honesty about his pain and his recovery that he describes as resulting from the magical meeting with Julie who was to become his wife and, it appears, his guide and muse.

At one point in his narrative he describes a moment when, during his struggle to write that resulted from the law suits, a “little gremlin would pop up on my shoulder in the form of a lawyer saying ‘Don’t do that.’” He continues, “One day I said to the gremlin, ‘Get out of my life. I own this. I sound like this. I’m embracing this.’ I was finally able to put that to rest and become comfortable with my own sound.” 

I would call this process “ordinary interactive imagination”. This is essentially the same imagery process described elsewhere on this blog and on my professional web site. But it is also something that many people do without training, spontaneously, and to good effect. He had a dialogue with an aspect of his own mind that he visualized as tasking the form of a gremlin and by addressing it, caused a change to occur. Brilliant!

"Empowered Patient" is a regular feature from CNN Medical News
correspondent Elizabeth Cohen.
In this piece, Ms. Cohen reports that five alternative therapy treatments really work. These include acupuncture; some herbs like St. John’s Wort; calcium, magnesium, and vitamin B6 for PMS; glucosamine for joint pain; and guided imagery for pain and anxiety (italics mine). She also includes a link to a University of Minnesota site where you can find a demonstration of a guided imagery session. You can also find an excellent article by Marian Sandmaier on my professional web site, The Inward Eye. "Imagine That", first published in Oprah Magazine in January of 2006 under another title, describes guided imagery, interviews some experts about it, and describes a session with yours truly as guide.